Discussion:
OT: Favorite kids books
(too old to reply)
lewmew
2007-11-08 14:54:30 UTC
Permalink
Since the topic came up . . . .

What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)

Skipping Winnie the Pooh and Dr. Suess, my kids loved:

Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria

Linda
Mary
2007-11-08 16:26:05 UTC
Permalink
The Egg Book! It was around in the 1950's, and can still be
purchased. It has wonderful illustrations, and a very simple story
about a lonely bunny that finds an egg. He pushes it, rolls it,
sniffs it, taps it, etc. Finally, the egg opens, and a baby chicken
comes out, becoming best friend to the bunny.

Later on, anything by Marguerite Henry, but particularly Brighty of
the Grand Canyon.

Best ever, though -- The Wind in the Willows!
MargW
2007-11-08 16:53:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary
The Egg Book! It was around in the 1950's, and can still be
purchased. It has wonderful illustrations, and a very simple story
about a lonely bunny that finds an egg. He pushes it, rolls it,
sniffs it, taps it, etc. Finally, the egg opens, and a baby chicken
comes out, becoming best friend to the bunny.
Later on, anything by Marguerite Henry, but particularly Brighty of
the Grand Canyon.
Best ever, though -- The Wind in the Willows!
If you have ever been to the lodge on the north rim of the Grand
Canyon, there is a lifesized statue of Brighty. I have a lovely
picture I took of it when we were there.

MargW
Cheryl Isaak
2007-11-08 17:20:03 UTC
Permalink
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".

Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it

C
L***@gmail.com
2007-11-08 18:04:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".
Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it
C
In our house, Curious George is a big hit, as are the Berenstain
Bears. We also love "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom", an alphabet book, and
"Z is for Zamboni", a hockey alphabet book. Story time is always such
fun. It's the most relaxing part of the day.

Louisa
Cheryl Isaak
2007-11-08 19:37:05 UTC
Permalink
On 11/8/07 1:04 PM, in article
Post by L***@gmail.com
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".
Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it
C
In our house, Curious George is a big hit, as are the Berenstain
Bears. We also love "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom", an alphabet book, and
"Z is for Zamboni", a hockey alphabet book. Story time is always such
fun. It's the most relaxing part of the day.
Louisa
We have Z is for Zamboni too! DD loved it. Find The Magic Hockey Stick for
bedtime reading out loud.

Cheryl
Joan E.
2007-11-08 22:55:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
We have Z is for Zamboni too! DD loved it. Find The Magic Hockey Stick for
bedtime reading out loud.
There's a new book out, "Dino-hockey" by Lisa Wheeler. I saw it at
our library conference a few weeks ago and *had* to get it for my
boss! A little background: You may have heard about the hoopla over
the NCAA trying to force universities with Indian mascots to change.
UND is one of those universities (although we don't actually have a
mascot) and we sued the NCAA. Anyway, my boss, a *huge* hockey fan,
thinks, if we have to change our name, we should change it to
Triceratops, since they used to live in ND and our geology dept. has a
triceratops skull in the lobby. This book has a triceratops as a
player and, what's more, it's wearing UND colors!!!

As far as favorite books, mine were "Pokey little puppy" (and I'm
pokey to this day!), Trixie Belden and Nancy Drew books, and "The
forgotten door", which I think started my love for fantasy books.

My oldest son, Nate, laughed his head off every time I read one
specific line in the book "The red ball" which taught spatial
concepts. To this day I can't understand why! I can also still
recite (20+ years later) the first few pages of "Paul Bunyan". All 3
of my kids also liked "The animals of Farmer Jones". My oldest liked
the Fraggle Rock books; my 2nd son disliked most books until I found
"The stinky cheese man and other fairly stupid tales", the Goosebumps
series and Shel Silverstein's books; DD liked pretty much anything I
read to her and still reads avidly, mostly horse books and now
romances, since she's 21.

Joan
MelissaD
2007-11-09 20:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joan E.
Post by Cheryl Isaak
We have Z is for Zamboni too! DD loved it. Find The Magic Hockey Stick for
bedtime reading out loud.
There's a new book out, "Dino-hockey" by Lisa Wheeler. I saw it at
our library conference a few weeks ago and *had* to get it for my
boss! A little background: You may have heard about the hoopla over
the NCAA trying to force universities with Indian mascots to change.
UND is one of those universities (although we don't actually have a
mascot) and we sued the NCAA. Anyway, my boss, a *huge* hockey fan,
thinks, if we have to change our name, we should change it to
Triceratops, since they used to live in ND and our geology dept. has a
triceratops skull in the lobby. This book has a triceratops as a
player and, what's more, it's wearing UND colors!!!
As far as favorite books, mine were "Pokey little puppy" (and I'm
pokey to this day!), Trixie Belden and Nancy Drew books, and "The
forgotten door", which I think started my love for fantasy books.
My oldest son, Nate, laughed his head off every time I read one
specific line in the book "The red ball" which taught spatial
concepts. To this day I can't understand why! I can also still
recite (20+ years later) the first few pages of "Paul Bunyan". All 3
of my kids also liked "The animals of Farmer Jones". My oldest liked
the Fraggle Rock books; my 2nd son disliked most books until I found
"The stinky cheese man and other fairly stupid tales", the Goosebumps
series and Shel Silverstein's books; DD liked pretty much anything I
read to her and still reads avidly, mostly horse books and now
romances, since she's 21.
Joan
I just looked in my bookcase and I still have my copy of "The Forgotten
Door" !! I loved that book! As a young adult I also liked the "Wrinkle In
Time" as well as the books by Zilpha Keatley Snyder - "The Velvet Room" and
"The Egypt Game" were my favorites. I really like "The Railway Children" by
E. Nesbit - and the film that was made of it as well.
I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books and the 5 Little Peppers books
too. I currently have an almost complete collection of old children's books
by Lucy Fitch Perkins - circa 1910 or so - all about twins - The Dutch
Twins, The Irish Twins, The Italian Twins - very interesting to read as a
child!
I did go through my horse phase and remember reading "Misty" and "King of
the Wind" too!
For fun I also enjoyed the Mrs. PiggleWiggle books and I read all the Little
House on the Prairie books as well.
And yes, these are all in my bookcase which is why I remember them so well -
I even enjoy reading them today.

Today I mostly read mysteries when I get a chance to relax and look at a
book - both of my teenagers love to read too which I'm glad of...I think on
our recent vacation to Washington state the enjoyed the stop at Powell's
Books in Portland the best! We all walked out of there with armfuls!

MelissaD
Arliss
2007-11-10 19:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joan E.
There's a new book out, "Dino-hockey" by Lisa Wheeler. I saw it at
our library conference a few weeks ago and *had* to get it for my
boss! A little background: You may have heard about the hoopla over
the NCAA trying to force universities with Indian mascots to change.
UND is one of those universities (although we don't actually have a
mascot) and we sued the NCAA. Anyway, my boss, a *huge* hockey fan,
thinks, if we have to change our name, we should change it to
Triceratops, since they used to live in ND and our geology dept. has a
triceratops skull in the lobby. This book has a triceratops as a
player and, what's more, it's wearing UND colors!!!
SNORT! Like green and white are unusual colors.

Arliss in North Dakota (sneaking a peak in on RCTN and and unable to resist
picking on Joan) (also an NDSU fan, which explains why I pick on my friend
Joan)
Joan E.
2007-11-13 21:49:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arliss
SNORT! Like green and white are unusual colors.
Hey! Did I *say* they were unusual??? No, only that they're UND
colors! :)
Post by Arliss
Arliss in North Dakota (sneaking a peak in on RCTN
Yeah, and what *are* you doing "sneaking"??? You should just come
back here full time!

Joan in eastern ND, the *good* side of the state, at the *Good* school!
L***@gmail.com
2007-11-12 23:00:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 1:04 PM, in article
Post by L***@gmail.com
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".
Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it
C
In our house, Curious George is a big hit, as are the Berenstain
Bears. We also love "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom", an alphabet book, and
"Z is for Zamboni", a hockey alphabet book. Story time is always such
fun. It's the most relaxing part of the day.
Louisa
We have Z is for Zamboni too! DD loved it. Find The Magic Hockey Stick for
bedtime reading out loud.
Cheryl
Thanks, I'll look for that one. Now that DS is playing hockey, it's a
BIG topic of conversation at our house all the time, and any new books
on the subject are welcome. There's a new hockey counting book out
now, too, by the authors of Z is for Zamboni, that I think may go
under the Christmas tree for DD.

Louisa
Cheryl Isaak
2007-11-13 11:40:09 UTC
Permalink
On 11/12/07 6:00 PM, in article
Post by L***@gmail.com
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 1:04 PM, in article
Post by L***@gmail.com
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".
Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it
C
In our house, Curious George is a big hit, as are the Berenstain
Bears. We also love "Chicka Chicka Boom Boom", an alphabet book, and
"Z is for Zamboni", a hockey alphabet book. Story time is always such
fun. It's the most relaxing part of the day.
Louisa
We have Z is for Zamboni too! DD loved it. Find The Magic Hockey Stick for
bedtime reading out loud.
Cheryl
Thanks, I'll look for that one. Now that DS is playing hockey, it's a
BIG topic of conversation at our house all the time, and any new books
on the subject are welcome. There's a new hockey counting book out
now, too, by the authors of Z is for Zamboni, that I think may go
under the Christmas tree for DD.
Louisa
I've leafed through the one about Bobby Orr and it's cute. Wish DD wasn't
too big for it already. You might think about the biographies of any
favorite players too. I'm thinking of chasing down the Cammi Granato bio for
DD. IF your DH is into hockey too, get him Ice Time.


I am once again doing the "search" for a couple of new hockey themed shirts
for DH or DD. (DS only wants ones with The Who or other bands on it. He has
his Lancer hockey shirts.)

C
Magic Mood Jeep
2007-11-08 19:37:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
On 11/8/07 9:54 AM, in article
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
We loved anything from Robert Munsch. They were funny, didn't talk down
(used big words sometimes) and every single one had a great tag line. My
favorites were "Yellow, Green and Purple" (about a girl that loved markers),
Murmel, "Alligator Baby", "Show and Tell", "We Share Everything" (about two
kindergartener that trade clothes) and "Mud Puddle". Every family needs
"Good Families Don't", "PaperBag Princess" and "Love You Forever".
Another favorite "Tell Me Something Happy".... Loved it
C
Not having kids myself, I'll have to draw upon my (fading) memory of what
*I* used to read (stepping into Sherman's & Mr. Peabody's Wayback machine
for that :) )

I would read anything that didn't bore me to death that my parents would let
me... some of my older sister's reading material was "not appropriate" for a
kid my age.

I devoured the Nancy Drew books - *and* my brother's Hardy Boy books
(surprising written by the same author), the old Bobbsey Twin stories (in
6th grad I was tested at a college level reading ability)..... then as I got
older I got into Isaac Asimov....Stephen King..... things kid of exploded
from there
--
--
The ONE and ONLY
lefthanded-pathetic-paranoid-psychotic-sarcastic-wiseass-ditzy former-blonde
in Bloomington! (And proud of it, too)©
email me at nalee1964 (at) insightbb (dot) com
http://community.webshots.com/user/mgcmdjeep
lucretia borgia
2007-11-08 19:54:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Nov 2007 14:37:30 -0500, "Magic Mood Jeep"
Post by Magic Mood Jeep
Not having kids myself, I'll have to draw upon my (fading) memory of what
*I* used to read (stepping into Sherman's & Mr. Peabody's Wayback machine
for that :) )
I would read anything that didn't bore me to death that my parents would let
me... some of my older sister's reading material was "not appropriate" for a
kid my age.
I devoured the Nancy Drew books - *and* my brother's Hardy Boy books
(surprising written by the same author), the old Bobbsey Twin stories (in
6th grad I was tested at a college level reading ability)..... then as I got
older I got into Isaac Asimov....Stephen King..... things kid of exploded
from there
--
You just reminded me, I loved the Biggles books - he was an ace flyer
bombing everyone else out of the sky and getting into scrapes in every
book.
Gill Murray
2007-11-08 20:01:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 8 Nov 2007 14:37:30 -0500, "Magic Mood Jeep"
Post by Magic Mood Jeep
Not having kids myself, I'll have to draw upon my (fading) memory of what
*I* used to read (stepping into Sherman's & Mr. Peabody's Wayback machine
for that :) )
I would read anything that didn't bore me to death that my parents would let
me... some of my older sister's reading material was "not appropriate" for a
kid my age.
I devoured the Nancy Drew books - *and* my brother's Hardy Boy books
(surprising written by the same author), the old Bobbsey Twin stories (in
6th grad I was tested at a college level reading ability)..... then as I got
older I got into Isaac Asimov....Stephen King..... things kid of exploded
from there
--
You just reminded me, I loved the Biggles books - he was an ace flyer
bombing everyone else out of the sky and getting into scrapes in every
book.
My brother was a big Biggles fan! My cousin ,in UK, has been selling
his original ones on Ebay, and doing quite nicely, thank you!

Gillian
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-09 07:36:43 UTC
Permalink
IIRC, the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boy books were written by a buncha
different people using the same formula, not just one author. The
author's name was like Betty Crocker -- not a real name of a real
person, just a symbol representing whoever really was responsible for it
in real life.
Post by Magic Mood Jeep
I devoured the Nancy Drew books - *and* my brother's Hardy Boy books
(surprising written by the same author), the old Bobbsey Twin stories
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-08 18:18:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
The following applies to my experience as a parent with children. As a
child, I basically only read biographies and science books along with
Reader's Digest (which, ironically enough, my children also enjoyed at
early ages).

We discovered many books that became our favorites when I got the
anthology, "Hey! Listen to This!" compiled by Jim Trelease, and I can't
recommend it, along with basically all the books mentioned in it, highly
enough.

We also enjoyed historical fiction written by Clyde Robert Bulla
(written at about a third-grade level so it's easy for beginning
chapter-book readers), although they are so old that you will probably
only find them in the library (such a SHAME!!!)

My oldest son ADORED the Frog and Toad easy reader books when he was
that age.
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
anne
2007-11-08 18:45:47 UTC
Permalink
lewmew says...
Post by lewmew
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Both kids loved Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. My son
didn't mind hearing the Madeline books (having yet another senior moment
and too sleepy to search for the author) because she did daring things.

One of the stupidest things I ever did was to stop reading bedtime
stories to them simply because I wanted some 'me' time.
--
another anne, add ingers to reply
Karen C in California
2007-11-08 19:39:24 UTC
Permalink
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.

Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.

When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh

For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
--
Karen C - California
www.CFSfacts.org where we give you the facts and dispel the myths
Myths, with research cites: http://www.aacfs.org/images/pdfs/myths.pdf

Finished 10/21/07 - Floral Elegance Collection "Crocus"

WIP: The Teacher, Bethany Angel,
Flowers of Hawaii (Jeanette Crews) for ME!!!
Retrieved from UFO pile: Marbek's Snow Angel

Editor/Proofreader www.IntlProofingConsortium.com
Design page http://www.KarenMCampbell.com/designs.html
lucretia borgia
2007-11-08 19:41:59 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
Lucille
2007-11-08 20:02:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
My mother loved books as much as I do and happily kept several of my very
favorites. They now sit on top of my kitchen cabinets, artfully arranged.
They were then and remain to this day my very favorites: Little Women,
Little Men and Jo's Boys, The Blue, Red and Yellow Fairy Books and Black
Beauty.

The pages are yellow and crisp, but they sit proudly gathering dust.

Lucille
Cheryl Isaak
2007-11-09 00:04:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
My mother loved books as much as I do and happily kept several of my very
favorites. They now sit on top of my kitchen cabinets, artfully arranged.
They were then and remain to this day my very favorites: Little Women,
Little Men and Jo's Boys, The Blue, Red and Yellow Fairy Books and Black
Beauty.
The pages are yellow and crisp, but they sit proudly gathering dust.
Lucille
I have a few of my mother and grandmother's books. I'll be keeping those no
matter what.

C
Gill Murray
2007-11-09 00:15:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
My mother loved books as much as I do and happily kept several of my very
favorites. They now sit on top of my kitchen cabinets, artfully arranged.
They were then and remain to this day my very favorites: Little Women,
Little Men and Jo's Boys, The Blue, Red and Yellow Fairy Books and Black
Beauty.
The pages are yellow and crisp, but they sit proudly gathering dust.
Lucille
I have a few of my mother and grandmother's books. I'll be keeping those no
matter what.
C
I still had my old Arthur Ransome books, AA Milne and Beatrix Potter.
When I realised I wouldn't be going back to UK to live, I brought them
back with me and at this time they are in my daughter's basement. Still
in the family!

G
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-09 07:34:25 UTC
Permalink
I believe the Fairy books are out in Project Gutenberg if you ever need
copies.
Post by Lucille
They were then and remain to this day my very favorites: Little Women,
Little Men and Jo's Boys, The Blue, Red and Yellow Fairy Books and Black
Beauty.
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
Lucille
2007-11-09 14:37:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
I believe the Fairy books are out in Project Gutenberg if you ever need
copies.
I think they might be considered much too scarey for today's kids. I
suppose they get all the blood and gore they need just by watching the news
on TV.
Post by Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
Post by Lucille
They were then and remain to this day my very favorites: Little Women,
Little Men and Jo's Boys, The Blue, Red and Yellow Fairy Books and Black
Beauty.
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
Cheryl Isaak
2007-11-08 23:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
I've got DD reading Misty of Chincoteague. Maybe that's next after she
finished the series.
C
L***@gmail.com
2007-11-09 19:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Isaak
Post by lucretia borgia
On Thu, 08 Nov 2007 11:39:24 -0800, Karen C in California
Post by Karen C in California
I babysat the same kids every weekend all through college.
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
For me, the big thing was a series of biographies, something like
Childhoods of Great Americans or something like that.
How about Black Beauty, good tear jerker that one.
I've got DD reading Misty of Chincoteague. Maybe that's next after she
finished the series.
C
I loved Misty! Two other authors I discovered when I was teaching were
Kit Pearson and Janet Lunn. They've both written great historical
fiction trilogies for tween and young teen girls.

Louisa
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-09 07:33:48 UTC
Permalink
You might appreciate one rule I established for my children from an
early age.

I never read a book twice in a row. I would read it as many times as
they wanted, but they had to have a different book before I read the
first book again. I would even alternate A - B - A - B etc. as long as
they wanted, but I would never, EVER read them a book two times in a row.
Post by Karen C in California
Jen loved "Green Eggs and Ham". Several times a night. Got to the
point that I could recite it from memory.
When Brad got old enough for bedtime stories, I tried every other Seuss
book in the house, hoping for a change. Nope. Now I was reading Sam I
Am 6-8 times a night. Aaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhh
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
c***@hotmail.com
2007-11-08 19:33:50 UTC
Permalink
"Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak. I could recite it and
my son would interject "turn the page!" at all the right spots.

"C is for Clown" by the Berensteins
From my childhood...
Half Magic
Ballet Shoes
Make Way for Ducklings
Blueberries for Sal
Ping the Duck

and the one with the man who wore 100 caps and the monkeys keep
stealing them... anyone remember the title??
anne
2007-11-08 22:49:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@hotmail.com
and the one with the man who wore 100 caps and the monkeys keep
stealing them... anyone remember the title??
Caps for Sale
--
another anne, add ingers to reply
Gill Murray
2007-11-08 20:00:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as
they grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That
was over 40 years ago.

I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome (
sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I
loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet
seat, and I would hang out in there reading, rather than do the
dishes!Loved all of Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise
she was from Concord, MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there
this summer.

Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.

Gillian
Lucille
2007-11-08 20:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as they
grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That was
over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of English
authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome ( sailing
books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I loved to
read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat, and I
would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved all of
Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from Concord,
MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.

AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
lucretia borgia
2007-11-08 20:35:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as they
grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That was
over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of English
authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome ( sailing
books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I loved to
read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat, and I
would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved all of
Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from Concord,
MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
You tell her Shrimp !
Lucille
2007-11-08 20:44:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as they
grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That was
over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of English
authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome ( sailing
books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I loved to
read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat, and I
would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved all of
Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from Concord,
MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
You tell her Shrimp !
I need to go on record stating that she's at least a few months younger than
I am, which makes her almost old.
Gill Murray
2007-11-08 20:49:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as they
grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That was
over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of English
authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome ( sailing
books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I loved to
read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat, and I
would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved all of
Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from Concord,
MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
You tell her Shrimp !
I need to go on record stating that she's at least a few months younger than
I am, which makes her almost old.
I do reluctantly have to admit, that I am exactly a month younger than
Lucille...and I, too, read under the covers with a torch (aka flash-light).

Gillian
lucretia borgia
2007-11-08 21:47:11 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Nov 2007 15:44:45 -0500, "Lucille" <***@now at
comcast..net> opined:

\>>>>
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
You tell her Shrimp !
I need to go on record stating that she's at least a few months younger than
I am, which makes her almost old.
Aha ! Now we have a pissing contest lol
Gill Murray
2007-11-09 00:11:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
\>>>>
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
You tell her Shrimp !
I need to go on record stating that she's at least a few months younger than
I am, which makes her almost old.
Aha ! Now we have a pissing contest lol
Huh, shows what YOU know. Ladies don't have pissing contests, we have
tinkle parties!LOLOL
Dr. Brat
2007-11-08 21:09:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as they
grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That was
over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of English
authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome ( sailing
books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I loved to
read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat, and I
would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved all of
Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from Concord,
MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read of
slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?

Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Lucille
2007-11-08 21:12:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as
they grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That
was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome (
sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I
loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat,
and I would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved
all of Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from
Concord, MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and
expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)

Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt." Now
that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
lucretia borgia
2007-11-08 21:49:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and
expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt." Now
that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
WE, plural WE, need to take these younger Brats and wamp them one.
Cheeky things !
Dr. Brat
2007-11-10 00:47:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
WE, plural WE, need to take these younger Brats and wamp them one.
Cheeky things !
Bring it on, ladies! Shall I set the tea water boiling?

Elizabeth
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 01:12:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by lucretia borgia
WE, plural WE, need to take these younger Brats and wamp them one.
Cheeky things !
Bring it on, ladies! Shall I set the tea water boiling?
Elizabeth
No, uncork a bottle !
Lucille
2007-11-10 02:53:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by lucretia borgia
WE, plural WE, need to take these younger Brats and wamp them one.
Cheeky things !
Bring it on, ladies! Shall I set the tea water boiling?
Elizabeth
No, uncork a bottle !
And it's coffee for me. Or, if that's not an option hot chocolate will do.
Gill Murray
2007-11-08 23:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as
they grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else. That
was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome (
sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I
loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet seat,
and I would hang out in there reading, rather than do the dishes!Loved
all of Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise she was from
Concord, MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and
expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt." Now
that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
I thought about it, Lucille!!!

I understood that "I" was for the subject, and "me" came after the
verb and was the object. . Like "I want you to believe ME".

Heavens, English grammar a zillion years back has no connection with
American grammar anyway. "GOTTEN"....I would have been sent to the
ptincipal for that one!! LOLOL

Don't get me started on double negatives!!!

G
Lucille
2007-11-09 00:01:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as
they grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else.
That was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome
( sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I
loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet
seat, and I would hang out in there reading, rather than do the
dishes!Loved all of Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise
she was from Concord, MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up
there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt."
Now that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
I thought about it, Lucille!!!
I understood that "I" was for the subject, and "me" came after the verb
and was the object. . Like "I want you to believe ME".
Heavens, English grammar a zillion years back has no connection with
American grammar anyway. "GOTTEN"....I would have been sent to the
ptincipal for that one!! LOLOL
Don't get me started on double negatives!!!
G
I aint got no problem with double negatives. That must be the American in
me.
Gill Murray
2007-11-09 00:13:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very little we
would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned watercolors. then as
they grew a bit Curious George was popular, and I forget what else.
That was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur Ransome
( sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all horsey books. I
loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women behind the toilet
seat, and I would hang out in there reading, rather than do the
dishes!Loved all of Louisa May Alcott. I was much surprised to realise
she was from Concord, MA, and in the 19th century, when we were up
there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably read
of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers with a
flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt."
Now that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
I thought about it, Lucille!!!
I understood that "I" was for the subject, and "me" came after the verb
and was the object. . Like "I want you to believe ME".
Heavens, English grammar a zillion years back has no connection with
American grammar anyway. "GOTTEN"....I would have been sent to the
ptincipal for that one!! LOLOL
Don't get me started on double negatives!!!
G
I aint got no problem with double negatives. That must be the American in
me.
And my brother told everyine when I left the UK, that I was going to
educate the Colonials!!!SSIIGGHHSSSS!! I failed!!
Gill Murray
2007-11-10 01:10:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very
little we would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned
watercolors. then as they grew a bit Curious George was popular,
and I forget what else. That was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur
Ransome ( sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all
horsey books. I loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women
behind the toilet seat, and I would hang out in there reading,
rather than do the dishes!Loved all of Louisa May Alcott. I was
much surprised to realise she was from Concord, MA, and in the
19th century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably
read of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers
with a flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said
"being older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to
illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne
Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than
dirt." Now that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
I thought about it, Lucille!!!
I understood that "I" was for the subject, and "me" came after the
verb and was the object. . Like "I want you to believe ME".
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.
Elizabeth
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 01:15:22 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 01:10:51 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.
Elizabeth
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.

The other thing that consistently comes up here in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Gill Murray
2007-11-10 02:04:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 01:10:51 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.
Elizabeth
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
The other thing that consistently comes up here in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!

There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!

G
Lucille
2007-11-10 02:58:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lucretia borgia
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 01:10:51 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.
Elizabeth
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it. The other thing that consistently comes up here
in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!
There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!
G
Hasn't anyone ever told them the joke about burying survivors? You would
think someone would have said something. I know I've heard a gazillion of
them.

L
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 13:21:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lucretia borgia
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 01:10:51 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.
Elizabeth
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it. The other thing that consistently comes up here
in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!
There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!
G
Hasn't anyone ever told them the joke about burying survivors? You would
think someone would have said something. I know I've heard a gazillion of
them.
L
Back in the day I used to call, now I give up and maybe because the
people one is communicating with are so much younger and you can tell
they are thinking "Stupid old bat, what does she know ?" So there's a
strike against you before you start. Ageism is alive and well.
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 13:18:41 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 02:04:11 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
The other thing that consistently comes up here in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!
There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!
G
I used to call the radio stations when something stupid was said but I
can't be bothered anymore. Maybe I am mellowing, or something lol
Lucille
2007-11-10 14:52:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 02:04:11 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
The other thing that consistently comes up here in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!
There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!
G
I used to call the radio stations when something stupid was said but I
can't be bothered anymore. Maybe I am mellowing, or something lol
Mellowing, you ??? More likely it's the something !!!
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 15:55:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 02:04:11 GMT, Gill Murray
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
The other thing that consistently comes up here in April is when they
refer to the sinking of the Titanic, a least one radio voice will say
"Fairview Cemetery is where some of the survivors are buried" - aaah
poor souls !
Yup, we were taken there, and it totally cracked me up!!
There are so many lttle things I see that absolutely infuriate me. Oh
well, it is better to be feisty, that just another vegetable!
G
I used to call the radio stations when something stupid was said but I
can't be bothered anymore. Maybe I am mellowing, or something lol
Mellowing, you ??? More likely it's the something !!!
You did not RDH in time !
Dr. Brat
2007-11-10 14:52:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
Those are midwestisms. I've finally broken DH of "in back of." Drives
me nuts, too. But the worst is "If I would of known, I would of went."

Elizabeth
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
lewmew
2007-11-10 15:00:35 UTC
Permalink
.
Post by Dr. Brat
Those are midwestisms. I've finally broken DH of "in back of." Drives
me nuts, too. But the worst is "If I would of known, I would of went."
.

One of my least favorite Kansas City-isms is "Forty Highway", "Seven
Highway" etc. You would never say "70 Interstate" would you?
Karen C in California
2007-11-10 17:36:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
One of my least favorite Kansas City-isms is "Forty Highway", "Seven
Highway" etc. You would never say "70 Interstate" would you?
Of course not; we just say "50" and the Highway is implied (unless it's
I-5, but that's a whole 'nother animal).

But I had to learn that KC-ism when I was doing proofreading for someone
in that area. I kept correcting it and she kept correcting my
correction. She'd grown up on it, and never thought to warn me in advance.
--
Karen C - California
www.CFSfacts.org where we give you the facts and dispel the myths
Myths, with research cites: http://www.aacfs.org/images/pdfs/myths.pdf

Finished 10/21/07 - Floral Elegance Collection "Crocus"

WIP: The Teacher, Bethany Angel,
Flowers of Hawaii (Jeanette Crews) for ME!!!
Retrieved from UFO pile: Marbek's Snow Angel

Editor/Proofreader www.IntlProofingConsortium.com
Design page http://www.KarenMCampbell.com/designs.html
Lucille
2007-11-10 14:57:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
Those are midwestisms. I've finally broken DH of "in back of." Drives me
nuts, too. But the worst is "If I would of known, I would of went."
Elizabeth
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and
expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
It's a good thing you don't live here in the South where you go "acrost" the
street.
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 15:57:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
Those are midwestisms. I've finally broken DH of "in back of." Drives me
nuts, too. But the worst is "If I would of known, I would of went."
Elizabeth
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate and
expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
It's a good thing you don't live here in the South where you go "acrost" the
street.
They caught it from all those snowbirding Nova Scotians lol For some
reasons many NSians also say 'lopsters' - I case the type slipped.
Bruce
2007-11-10 16:19:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
It's a good thing you don't live here in the South where you go "acrost" the
street.
Saying "write me" instead of "write to me" seems to be a phrase that is
becoming quite popular in the UK. And pronunciation is becoming quite
sloppy, even the news readers and announcers on BBC Radio 4 have begun
to say "pitcher" instead of "picture" or "nukyelar" instead of
"nuclear". My own accent is far from being that of John Snagge or Stuart
Hibbert but I do try to maintain certain standards.
My goodness, don't I sound ancient! It really must be a sign of old age
- Maureen frequently reprimands me for shouting at the wireless.
Bruce
lucretia borgia
2007-11-10 15:56:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by lucretia borgia
As well as gotten, add 'in back of' and 'off of' - drives me crazy
everytime they say it.
Those are midwestisms. I've finally broken DH of "in back of." Drives
me nuts, too. But the worst is "If I would of known, I would of went."
Elizabeth
Or the Newfoundland one "Don't come where I'm to, I'll come where
you're at" lol
Bruce
2007-11-10 09:23:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
Is it just me showing my age or did anyone else find it difficult to
listen to the introduction to "Star Trek" without wincing when they
heard the speaker say "...to boldly go..." instead of "...to go boldly...."
--
Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
Lucille
2007-11-10 12:30:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bruce
Post by Gill Murray
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
Is it just me showing my age or did anyone else find it difficult to
listen to the introduction to "Star Trek" without wincing when they heard
the speaker say "...to boldly go..." instead of "...to go boldly...."
--
Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney
That's a split infinitive and not really incorrect. Just to be sure I
looked it up and found the following definition at Ask Oxford:

What is a split infinitive, and why should I avoid using one?


This is a split infinitive:

To boldly go where no man has gone before!
The infinitive is to go, and it has been 'split' by the adverb boldly. Split
infinitives have been the cause of much controversy among teachers and
grammarians, but the notion that they are ungrammatical is simply a myth: in
his famous book Modern English Usage, Henry Fowler listed them among
'superstitions'!

Split infinitives are frequently poor style, but they are not strictly bad
grammar. In the example above, to avoid the split infinitive would result
either in weakness (to go boldly) or over-formality (boldly to go): either
would ruin the rhythmic force and rhetorical pattern of the original. It is
probably good practice to avoid split infinitives in formal writing, but
clumsy attempts to avoid them simply by shuffling adverbs about can create
far worse sentences.



Maybe again, this is an American thing.

Lucille
Joy Beeson
2007-11-11 00:55:26 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 09:23:25 +0000, Bruce
Post by Bruce
Post by Gill Murray
Ok, Prof, I concede.....but I still will not use "gotten, or a double
negativE LOL
Is it just me showing my age or did anyone else find it difficult to
listen to the introduction to "Star Trek" without wincing when they
heard the speaker say "...to boldly go..." instead of "...to go boldly...."
Nope. Putting an adverb between "to" and an infinitive isn't a
grammatical error, it's an exclamation-point error. And they meant to
put an exclamation point on "boldly", so the sentence as intoned is
correct.

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
http://n3f.home.comcast.net/ -- Writers' Exchange
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
Dr. Brat
2007-11-10 00:45:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gill Murray
Post by Lucille
Post by Dr. Brat
Post by Lucille
Post by Gill Murray
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My kids were read a lot of books from my childhood; when very
little we would read Beatrix Potter with the old-fashioned
watercolors. then as they grew a bit Curious George was popular,
and I forget what else. That was over 40 years ago.
I grew up with A.A. Milne (the REAL Winnie the Pooh) and a host of
English authors; Enid Blyton, who wrote prodigiously, Arthur
Ransome ( sailing books), and Moorland Mouse, Golden Gorse, all
horsey books. I loved to read, and I remember hiding Little Women
behind the toilet seat, and I would hang out in there reading,
rather than do the dishes!Loved all of Louisa May Alcott. I was
much surprised to realise she was from Concord, MA, and in the 19th
century, when we were up there this summer.
Of course there was no TV...Lucille, being older than me, probably
read of slates!!!! r,d,&h.
Gillian
Nope, Twas parchment scrolls for me. And it was under the covers
with a flashlight.
AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH What do you younguns know anyhow ????
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said
"being older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Elizabeth (the bratty one... *heh*)
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to
illuminate and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
Of course I was just delighted that she didn't say "older than dirt."
Now that might have been a reason for her to r,d&H
I thought about it, Lucille!!!
I understood that "I" was for the subject, and "me" came after the verb
and was the object. . Like "I want you to believe ME".
Yes, but in this case, I is the subject because there is an implied
verb. She is older than I (am). You would use me if you said "I'm gald
she's picking on you rather than (on) me" for example.

Elizabeth
--
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~living well is the best revenge~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
The most important thing one woman can do for another is to illuminate
and expand her sense of actual possibilities. --Adrienne Rich
*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-09 07:39:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lucille
Older than I just sounds awkwarder. So there ;*)
But "older than I am" doesn't.
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply
2007-11-09 07:38:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. Brat
OoooH! Pick me, pick me! *I* know that Gillian should have said "being
older than *I*" rather than *me*. Does that make me young?
Actually, either can be correct. "I" would be for formal/classical
literary English in some grammar styles, and "me" would correct in less
formal situations and in other grammar styles. You can make a good case
for either. d
--
Every job is a self-portrait of the person who does it. Autograph your
work with excellence.
Susan Hartman
2007-11-08 21:22:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
What a fun thread!

"Big Dog, Little Dog"
Robert Louis Stevenson "A Child's Garden of Verse"
Mother Goose
"The B Book" by the Berenstains
Sweet Pickles series, particularly "Goof Off Goose" and "Moody Moose"
and "Xerus Won't Allow It" (discovered by my young nieces now, and they
love 'em, too)
"Goodnight Moon"
"Where the Wild Things Are"
"The Christmas Day Cat" by Tasha Tudor (still a favorite!)
Amelia Bedelia books
Angelina Ballerina books

Interesting to see the roads each kid has taken, given the similarity in
their earliest reading. DS reads pretty exclusively non-fiction and not
a lot; DD#1 almost exclusively sci-fi/fantasy, and incessantly; and DD#2
historic fiction/romance/chick lit (not as much as her sister or me, but
still more than the average 19 y.o., I dare say).

Sue
--
Susan Hartman/Dirty Linen
The Magazine of Folk and World Music
www.dirtylinen.com
Susan Hartman
2007-11-08 21:30:17 UTC
Permalink
I knew I forgot something!

How about "least favorite book that your kids *loved*"?

We had several "Ant and Bee" books that the kids loved, but I HATED!
Read them ad nauseum....

An English series about an ant and a bee and their (mis)adventures that
weren't very adventurous...just repetitive

Sue
--
Susan Hartman/Dirty Linen
The Magazine of Folk and World Music
www.dirtylinen.com
Donna
2007-11-09 13:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
When my children were little, little we had four of Sandra Boynton's
books - you know the kind toddlers can chew on. I can still recite
Moo, Baa. La La La and the Going to Bed Book. We read to our children
every night till they were 12 and 10. The book they say they remember
the most is Tolkein's The Hobbit. I admit to silently cursing while
reading this out loud because I never properly learned phonics and I
would get stymied by some of his made up words. (Which reminds me of
my son at 3 and 4, deep into his dinosaur phase, telling me I was
pronouncing the names incorrectly. I'm sure I was.)

We didn't have many books in my house while I was growing up, maybe
less than a dozen other than the set of World Book Encyclopedias. But
fortunately for me, the library was a block from my house and I read
my way through the entire library. My all-time childhood favorite is
Little Women. I reread it every few years and still cry when Beth
dies. And still I want Jo to marry Teddy.

Donna in Virginia
Arnhild
2007-11-09 21:07:02 UTC
Permalink
I don't have any kids, but I had some favourites myself. The two first
books I remember reading or having read to me,
were Apple Pigs by Ruth Orbach, and The Boy who was Followed Home by
Margaret Mahy. (I read them in translation.)

The books I have most enjoyed reading to children are the ones by
Dr.Seuss, and the Berenstain Bears.


Arnhild
headway
2007-11-10 00:33:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
Red Light Green Light (Margaret Brown of Good Night Moon fame)
Green Bear
Frank Asch books
Tacky the Penguin (I actually still have a Tacky someplace they gave
me!)
Good Dog Carl
McDuff books
Officer Buckle & Gloria
Linda
My favorites were the William Farley books (Black Beauty, etc), The
Bobbsey Twins, and early Heinlien and Norton. My sons were the
Dinotopia books - amazing series about humans and dinosaurs living and
working together, and the Narnia books.

Dee
Darla
2007-11-17 22:27:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by lewmew
Since the topic came up . . . .
What were your favorite books to read to your kids (or that they loved
to hear)? (Or yours, for that matter.)
P D Eastman's "Are You My Mother?"
The Henry and Ribsy books

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